KGSR Presents: The Revivalists

with Greyhounds

Apr 15

KGSR Presents: The Revivalists

with Greyhounds

Doors: 8:00 pm
Age: All ages
Price:$22 Advance GA / $25 Day of Show GA
Buy Tickets

The Revivalists

It’s actually surprising that when The Revivalists take the stage, the entire planet doesn’t hear them playing–yes, their sound is that big. It’s not just because this band – who have performed everywhere across the country – has seven members and perform with a wide breadth on instruments. It is because there is so much passion spewing out of these guys that it’s completely impossible to ignore them.

After seven years of making music together, New Orleans rock hybrid The Revivalists (David Shaw – vocals, Zack Feinberg – guitar, Andrew Campanelli – drums, Ed Williams – pedal steel guitar, George Gekas – bass, Rob Ingraham – saxophone, and Michael Girardot – keyboards & trumpet) are set to deliver their latest studio album, Men Amongst Mountains. The forthcoming release, out on July 17, is an album about growth. It is appropriate, then, that the band set out to challenge itself while writing and recording their latest batch of music.

The Revivalists cloistered themselves within the intimate confines of Bogalusa, LA’s Studio in the Country for nearly two weeks while recording Men Amongst Mountains, taking advantage of the studio’s generous acoustics by setting up in a single room and recording to tape in an effort to induce a more performance-based sensibility. New Orleans’ Esplanade and Living Room Studios hosted the finishing touches to an album which leans first and foremost on capturing authentic moments in warm, rich tones and with a distinctly raw, old-world feel.

Mirroring the broader themes which connect the individual songs on the album, the recording and instrumentation on Men Amongst Mountains represents the next step in The Revivalists’ ever-evolving depth and maturity. Like the band’s vaunted live shows, Men Amongst Mountains can and will turn on a dime. The gentle gives way to the heavy, the acoustic to the orchestral. Despair becomes hope. Fire becomes light. At times, the obstacles and troubles in our lives can make the world seem impossibly, hopelessly big. Men Amongst Mountains, ultimately, is about the journey that makes us greater than the mountains standing in our way.

Greyhounds

"The war is on for your mind," sings Anthony Farrell, one half of the soulful Austin duo Greyhounds, "and we're on the same side." Arriving midway through the band's adventurous new album, 'Change Of Pace,' the line serves as a powerful refrain, with Farrell's voice peaking in intensity over musical partner Andrew Trube's chirping electric guitar. But more than just a memorable hook, it's an encapsulation of the shift in consciousness that defines the album, Greyhounds' second—and finest—collection of funky, blues-and-R&B-laced rock and roll for the iconic Ardent label.

"This record has a lot more to do with what's around us and our perceptions of that," explains Trube, who splits songwriting and singing duties with Farrell. "We're passionate about what's going on right now, and it's not necessarily 'political,' but as an artist, I feel like it's our duty to provide this looking glass for people to see what's going on around them and encourage them to wake up and start taking care of the world and each other."

Trube and Farrell first met while living in California, where an L.A. Weekly classified ad brought them together. The connection between the guitarist and keyboard player was instantaneous, and the remarkable magic they conjure together has since earned them widespread attention from critics and peers alike. Derek Trucks raved that "Greyhounds make real music, the right way and for the right reasons," while JJ Grey described their songs as landing "somewhere between a heartfelt hymn and the dirtiest jank you've ever heard in your life," and Gary Clark Jr. summed up a recent LA show by tweeting simply that they "crushed it as usual." Meanwhile, Esquire hailed their debut as "intoxicating [and] gut-wrenchingly lovely," USA Today compared them to "The Meters, Earl Hooker and Buck Owens," and Texas Monthly fell under the spell of their "ringing guitar…bluesy swagger, and all the pain a strained falsetto can convey."

That responsibility rings out loud and clear in songs like the slow-burning come-together anthem "Walls"—where Farrell sings "What happened to the feeling that we can make a change?"—and "Sizzle"—which finds Farrell reflecting, "So many people just don't seem to care / They think that it doesn't matter because it's happening over there / But they forget that all nations used to be one / Living under the same sun." There are lighter moments, to be sure, like the playful, Trube-penned "Late Night Slice," in addition to the deep wells of emotion that bubble up on the heartbroken "Cuz I'm Here" and the funky "For You," but across the board, the album showcases the remarkable artistic maturation the band has undergone in the short time since releasing 'Accumulator.'

If 'Change Of Pace' is any indication, the Farrell-Trube filter is working in peak condition right now, and the timing couldn't be any better. The war is on for your mind, and Greyhounds' new album is without a doubt a win for the good guys.